Nonsense Lab

Gordon Matta-Clark
Splitting
1974

Rebecca BelmoreFringe2008chromogenic transparency in lightbox

Rebecca Belmore
Fringe
2008
chromogenic transparency in lightbox

Dang Vanity Ratio



Nirvana Ago Ditty
A Dragon Nativity

Today Ranting Via
Today Raving Anti
Dignitary Nova At
Toady Ingrain Vat
Ad Organ Nativity
Avoid Gain Tyrant
Avatar Dignity On
Avatar Dying Into
Variant Dating Yo
Dating Via Notary
Tiara Vanity Dong
Avian Tango Dirty
Avidity Gonna Art!
Radio Gnat Vanity
Radiant Tango Ivy
Radiant Vanity Go (Go (Go)
Attain Angry Void
Attaining Ova Dry
Data Navy Rioting
Vagina Yarn Ditto
Radon Gait Vanity
Diva Gyration Tan
Vagrant Nay Idiot
Aviation Dang Try

Dang Vanity Ratio

Nirvana Ago Ditty
A Dragon Nativity

Today Ranting Via
Today Raving Anti

Dignitary Nova At
Toady Ingrain Vat

Ad Organ Nativity
Avoid Gain Tyrant

Avatar Dignity On
Avatar Dying Into

Variant Dating Yo
Dating Via Notary

Tiara Vanity Dong
Avian Tango Dirty

Avidity Gonna Art!
Radio Gnat Vanity

Radiant Tango Ivy
Radiant Vanity Go (Go (Go)

Attain Angry Void
Attaining Ova Dry

Data Navy Rioting
Vagina Yarn Ditto

Radon Gait Vanity
Diva Gyration Tan

Vagrant Nay Idiot
Aviation Dang Try

Survival Research Laboratories
A Million Inconsiderate Experiments
1996
machine performance and video

Traditional Indian dance mask from the town of Monimbo, adopted by the rebels during the fight against Somoza to conceal identity. Nicaragua, 1978.

—Susan Meiselas

Traditional Indian dance mask from the town of Monimbo, adopted by the rebels during the fight against Somoza to conceal identity. Nicaragua, 1978.

Susan Meiselas

Department of Biological Flow
ICQ (Inverted Cubofuturist Query)
2011
performance
Toronto Nuit Blanche 2011
approx. 30mins

- - -

"See and be seen. Interpolate and interpellate. In an explicit gesture to Duchamp and the Russian Futurists, the Department of Biological Flow offers ICQ (Inverted Cubofuturist Query), a performance that reconsiders the question of tempo in public space and interrogates opportunities for movement in the contemporary vision machine.”

-

Program:

1. Plug kinoderm tail appendage into faux kino-gait transcribing device.
2. Begin walking staircase. Ensure a steady rhythm.
3. Using surgical devices at hand (scissors, small garden shears, Japanese band saw, large BBQ knife), cut away from kinoderm while walking up stairs.
4. If gait slows down too much, cease cutting and resume steady rhythm.
5. The performance ends once the artist has cut free from the kinoderm and fled the gaze.

-

(The full video for a second performance of ICQ (Inverted Cubofuturist Query) in 2012 may be viewed on Youtube.)

Marina Abramović and UlayBreathing In, Breathing Out1977still from performance

- - -

"Ulay and Abramovic introduce the video of ‘Breathing in, Breathing out’ (April 1977, Belgrade) as follows: ‘We are kneeling face to face, pressing our mouths together. Our noses are blocked with cigarette filters.’ Ulay says: ‘I am breathing in oxygen. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’ Abramovic: ‘I am breathing in carbon dioxide. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’ Ulay: ‘I am breathing in carbon dioxide. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’ In November of the same year, the reverse version of ‘Breathing in, Breathing out’ was performed at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam under the title ‘Breathing out, Breathing in’. The intimacy suggested by the video still is actually misleading. For almost twenty minutes, Ulay and Abramovic depend desperately on each other to stay alive. They share their breath, without external access to oxygen. The physical struggle that ensues due to the lack of oxygen and to the breathing in of carbon dioxide is visibly exhausting. Abramovic is sweating profusely; her breathing is clearly audible. Ulay manages to control the rhythm of his breathing for slightly longer, but soon he is suffering too. At that point, Ulay and Abramovic are no longer sitting still, but are moving vehemently to and fro until they cannot take it anymore. They let go of each other’s mouths, gasping to regain their breath. Compared to the other performances based on bodily stamina, this highly strenuous performance is relatively short, due to the lack of the most essential ingredient of life.”

Marina Abramović and Ulay
Breathing In, Breathing Out
1977
still from performance

- - -

"Ulay and Abramovic introduce the video of ‘Breathing in, Breathing out’ (April 1977, Belgrade) as follows: ‘We are kneeling face to face, pressing our mouths together. Our noses are blocked with cigarette filters.’ Ulay says: ‘I am breathing in oxygen. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’ Abramovic: ‘I am breathing in carbon dioxide. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’ Ulay: ‘I am breathing in carbon dioxide. I am breathing out carbon dioxide.’ In November of the same year, the reverse version of ‘Breathing in, Breathing out’ was performed at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam under the title ‘Breathing out, Breathing in’. The intimacy suggested by the video still is actually misleading. For almost twenty minutes, Ulay and Abramovic depend desperately on each other to stay alive. They share their breath, without external access to oxygen. The physical struggle that ensues due to the lack of oxygen and to the breathing in of carbon dioxide is visibly exhausting. Abramovic is sweating profusely; her breathing is clearly audible. Ulay manages to control the rhythm of his breathing for slightly longer, but soon he is suffering too. At that point, Ulay and Abramovic are no longer sitting still, but are moving vehemently to and fro until they cannot take it anymore. They let go of each other’s mouths, gasping to regain their breath. Compared to the other performances based on bodily stamina, this highly strenuous performance is relatively short, due to the lack of the most essential ingredient of life.”

Zhang HuanFamily Tree2000performance

Zhang Huan
Family Tree
2000
performance

Ingrid

First, re: dress, we need some language. Take two circles, diagonal or perhaps transversal to one another. Call it the portal-openings of yin and yang, or maybe the colon of linguistic precedent and thereafter, or the operational sign of mathematical notation, the eyes of occidental emoticon, or instruction of computer code. Always already in motion, they blur a vector that faintly suggests teardrops. Connect the teardrop trails of these two circles together with a wavy line, a line whose very thickness is the expressed topology of a probability curve in vibration, traces of which leave the retinal afterimage that constitutes the thickness itself but do not exhaust its possible vibrations lying virtually beyond. In this it is a snapshot of a particular wave at a moment’s notice, a point of inscription suggesting a relative harmony and its more-than, but which might also resemble sine or cosine and their normativity when viewed with a particular font-type.

Pluck the string: it is the weave that connects and communicates the two teary-eyed circles and which suggests the presence of many more, for “there are always two, even when you perceive one, connected.” The philosophy is in the bassline. Strum the fibres gently, periodically, intensively. It’s all in the rhythm, and the amplitude and the frequency. Weave the string: fibres of relation and their memories, wrapped together more or less firmly yet always in processes of decay and regeneration. The philosophy is in the treble, doubled as an aesthetics of tango and a politics of touch move to the networks of discourse. Bind the fibres tight, but give the space from which one may choose to return.

Redress. No longer Shannon’s differential equation doubled, though there are limits approached, again and again — the limits of the probably-possible. And these limits are not mathematically calculated but felt and embodied. They are an ambiguously understood affection of relation as it emerges from difference to the violence always already implicated in identifying the other as other — yet no less powerfully felt for the experience.

They resemble the “moving-limit” of an electromagnetic force field as two charged objects approach one another, at first aligned so as to attract but then rotating at the limit so as to repel, gently or forcefully depending on the volume and intensity of the respective bodies and magnetic fields in question. These are the mathematical operators of “positive” and “negative” above, the plus and minus of the Switch-as-relational-field.

But we aren’t switches, we’re curves. Moving curves, all societies of bubbles in tension and deformation at every instant, even as a vibrating wave of bubbles envelops and separates us all. Analog electricity and effervescent soma. The differential waveline signifies this approach to the limit as well as the vibrating potentials that emerge and exist as their ontogenetic terms affectively turn — spin — from positive to negative and back again. And forth again, a tango aesthetics or a politics of touch in motion, magnetically.

But we aren’t magnets, either, we’re edges. Moving edges, all fractals in proximity and trauma at every instant, even as a vibrating wave of resonance appears to dull their iterable quality. The differential wave signifies this edge in its image, though only as a set of probabilities that does not exhaust the potentials which lie virtually beyond. These edges move and their limits can be moved, in other words, their proximity and trauma dependent on the fractal patterns in question and the speed of the gestural cut. See? Saw. Push and pull and vibrate, the experience of the limit can be moved-in-negotiation over time, freed from its moorings or felt as the cut of separation (which is really felt as a tear). The question of ethics is precisely this question of how we approach the limit and its movement.

Spoken as such, this tattoo writes the skin of my chip, of my logic. We carry these sorts of signs with us all along, we affective cyborgs. From where do they arrive? From whom are they inscribed? What do we really mean? And is this the singular sign of all affective cyborgs? (Take pause.) No. It is the sign of my affective cyborg, a contagion that should perish in the intense afterburn of our programmed execution.

_____

excerpted from “Post-Mortem: Relational Passages”,
chapter seven of On Performing the University of Disaster (in press).

Department of Biological Flow
RGB (Retinal Ganzfeld Bitcast)
2011
(re)mixed media sculpture
installation view and detail

at “Brazil”
May 24, 2012
Electricity is Magic Gallery