Nonsense Lab

Department of Biological Flow
Thanks for Watching
2014
performance score and video

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#timespace815

Department of Biological Flow
Reflexive Mottle
2013
programmed analog process

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[1] Flip image horizontal.
[2] Downsize image by 1%.
[3] Repeat 10x.
[4] Flip image vertical.
[5] Downsize image by 1%.
[6] Repeat 10x.
[7] Flip image horizontal.
[8] Stretch image by 1%.
[9] Repeat 10x.
[10] Flip image vertical.
[11] Stretch image by 1%.
[12] Repeat 10x.
[13] Save image as new file.

(n=259)

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#MSPaint

Department of Biological Flow
Three Lines for Plant Activation
2014
motion study and video

Department of Biological FlowThe Acceleration TourSeptember 20, 2013Montreal, QCTime Forms conference

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ACCELERATA: SIXTEEN THESES

1. Whether or not one understands time as unfolding in a linear fashion is immaterial; what matters is that experience and connectedness unfold along multiple and interweaving time signatures.

2. It is the time signature which produces affects, not time itself.

3. A collective energetics remains unevenly distributed. Nonetheless, its collectiveness always remains impressive, inspiring and humbling.

4. Dehabituated rhythms and changed or differential spatial parameters offer an invitation for novel gestural responses to the artwork.

5. When movement moves its way into the “aesthetic experience” proper, it continues to want to move, this time with the artwork, co-composing with it, contouring and creating with it.

6. It is not so much fatigue that one initially notices upon arrival at an artwork, but rather an interference of rhythms between runner and work, which thereafter gradually begin to harmonize or compromise. These resonances are of immediate interest in an aesthetico-ethical sense.

7. Habit can have unrefined pathways; one of these concerns its tempo.

8. Bodies are not “ideal”, and thus neither should goals be. We understand these both in an affirmative sense.

9. The outwardly prosthetic body only makes evident and explicit the co-composition of all bodies.

10. A familiar gesture, machined differently, can be more more useful than a complex gesture known only to a few.

11. We are describing here an unhygienic experience (sweat, snot, traffic, noise, topography). Which is also in some ways to say we have been removed from the laboratory.

12. Speed only demands a greater adeptness with contingency and the aesthetics of failure.

13. There are both inner and outer accelerations that need to be considered in developing and evaluating the program.

14. If one seeks to create a nuclear or exponential energy field, one cannot initiate the reaction at maximum capacity. Rather, the intensity must be slowly increased to avoid the risk of rupture in a very real material sense.

15. The event itself is a collective enunciation — of gesture and energy. But so long as we remain bound to the particulars of language and its transmission, this collective enunciation must retain a spoken or written dimension as well. Breath must become metric rather than simply serving to inspire and expire.

16. Theses are exhausted and replenished much like mitochondrial reactors and muscular fibres. To elaborate: they, too, have relative catalytic points, elasticities and failure thresholds in the generation of things. And they, too, may also become fuel or worm food for future becomings …

Department of Biological Flow
The Acceleration Tour
September 20, 2013
Montreal, QC
Time Forms conference

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ACCELERATA: SIXTEEN THESES

1. Whether or not one understands time as unfolding in a linear fashion is immaterial; what matters is that experience and connectedness unfold along multiple and interweaving time signatures.

2. It is the time signature which produces affects, not time itself.

3. A collective energetics remains unevenly distributed. Nonetheless, its collectiveness always remains impressive, inspiring and humbling.

4. Dehabituated rhythms and changed or differential spatial parameters offer an invitation for novel gestural responses to the artwork.

5. When movement moves its way into the “aesthetic experience” proper, it continues to want to move, this time with the artwork, co-composing with it, contouring and creating with it.

6. It is not so much fatigue that one initially notices upon arrival at an artwork, but rather an interference of rhythms between runner and work, which thereafter gradually begin to harmonize or compromise. These resonances are of immediate interest in an aesthetico-ethical sense.

7. Habit can have unrefined pathways; one of these concerns its tempo.

8. Bodies are not “ideal”, and thus neither should goals be. We understand these both in an affirmative sense.

9. The outwardly prosthetic body only makes evident and explicit the co-composition of all bodies.

10. A familiar gesture, machined differently, can be more more useful than a complex gesture known only to a few.

11. We are describing here an unhygienic experience (sweat, snot, traffic, noise, topography). Which is also in some ways to say we have been removed from the laboratory.

12. Speed only demands a greater adeptness with contingency and the aesthetics of failure.

13. There are both inner and outer accelerations that need to be considered in developing and evaluating the program.

14. If one seeks to create a nuclear or exponential energy field, one cannot initiate the reaction at maximum capacity. Rather, the intensity must be slowly increased to avoid the risk of rupture in a very real material sense.

15. The event itself is a collective enunciation — of gesture and energy. But so long as we remain bound to the particulars of language and its transmission, this collective enunciation must retain a spoken or written dimension as well. Breath must become metric rather than simply serving to inspire and expire.

16. Theses are exhausted and replenished much like mitochondrial reactors and muscular fibres. To elaborate: they, too, have relative catalytic points, elasticities and failure thresholds in the generation of things. And they, too, may also become fuel or worm food for future becomings …

Department of Biological Flow
Pinkeye
2012
mixed media and closed-circuit video installation

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Pinkeye challenges normative understandings of the surveillance apparatus by introducing qualities of contagion, infection or proliferation to the cybernetic coupling of the closed-circuit video loop. Given the static nature of the installation, however, this contagion is ambiguous: does it attack the central locus of surveillant optics, or is it rather being secreted outward in capillarized form?

Anna Mikhailovskaia
Draw.Cut.Fall. (Disappearing Act)
45 min. video performance edited for time to 1 min.

Jenine Shereos
Breath(e)
mixed media installation

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Branch-like forms move subtly, fading in and out almost imperceptibly, as sounds of wind and breathing undulate in the background. A mysterious object is suspended in the center of the wall, and is revealed as the video fades to white. The viewer has the opportunity to align their shadow with this object, a pair of lungs constructed using fibrous materials, thus positioning themselves simultaneously within the body and within the landscape. Notions of the body, time and memory are alluded to within the work.

Breath(e) is an exploration of the ‘permeable boundary’ that exists between our physical bodies and the world around us. There is a literal exchange that occurs within every inhale and every exhale. This exchange, subliminal and subtle, happens beneath the surface. It is background, peripheral, like the passing of a breeze through branches. Yet it is this exchange that fuels us. When we are without it, we are without breath, without life.

Metaphorically, the act of breathing speaks to the continuous dialog, the ongoing give and take that occurs in each person’s life. As we daily leave our marks in the world, the world leaves its marks upon us. I am interested in the way these interactions are absorbed through the body, leaving their residue within our memory.

Karla Solano
Hogar (Home)
2004
stills from video

Cindy Shermanfrom the Art21 short filmMannequins & Masks

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"Today we are all ‘creators’, all able to see ourselves extended into the data networks of the ludic-virtual. In other words, all complicit in the creation of a new mirror — a slightly kaleidoscopic mirror, mind you — but one that captivates us like Narcissus long beyond that mirror phase of childhood. Like the two-way sort used in clinical psychology, however, this new era of the interactive is at once mirror and screen, at once opportunity for enclosed self-contemplation and open performance. For we all know what lurks behind the silvering of this new mirror in the Facebook Polis and that is the gaze: sometimes manifest as benevolent glance and sometimes as cold, clinical, unblinking stare. Always performance.

Narcissus never suspected that Echo was swimming below the surface of the pool, but we know better.

This blur between mirror and screen is perhaps best understood in the language used to describe it: ‘one-way mirror’, ‘two-way mirror’, ‘one-way glass’ and ‘two-way glass’ are all used interchangeably, two sets of complete opposites in recombination to express the same concept. The fragmented subject only finds confusion in its attempts to articulate its relation to the interface; even with this 2x2 matrix the concept eludes us. Political action in the Facebook Polis must consider both the material element of this membrane between gesture and vision as well as its relative opacity in approaching the speed of light — the panoptic space is obsolesced by our very reflection.”

— from “The Facebook Polis”

Cindy Sherman
from the Art21 short film
Mannequins & Masks

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"Today we are all ‘creators’, all able to see ourselves extended into the data networks of the ludic-virtual. In other words, all complicit in the creation of a new mirror — a slightly kaleidoscopic mirror, mind you — but one that captivates us like Narcissus long beyond that mirror phase of childhood. Like the two-way sort used in clinical psychology, however, this new era of the interactive is at once mirror and screen, at once opportunity for enclosed self-contemplation and open performance. For we all know what lurks behind the silvering of this new mirror in the Facebook Polis and that is the gaze: sometimes manifest as benevolent glance and sometimes as cold, clinical, unblinking stare. Always performance.

Narcissus never suspected that Echo was swimming below the surface of the pool, but we know better.

This blur between mirror and screen is perhaps best understood in the language used to describe it: ‘one-way mirror’, ‘two-way mirror’, ‘one-way glass’ and ‘two-way glass’ are all used interchangeably, two sets of complete opposites in recombination to express the same concept. The fragmented subject only finds confusion in its attempts to articulate its relation to the interface; even with this 2x2 matrix the concept eludes us. Political action in the Facebook Polis must consider both the material element of this membrane between gesture and vision as well as its relative opacity in approaching the speed of light — the panoptic space is obsolesced by our very reflection.”

— from “The Facebook Polis”

Bruce Nauman
Walking in an Exaggerated Manner around the Perimeter of a Square
1967-68
performance/16mm film
10:30