Nonsense Lab

Department of Biological Flow
Three Lines for Plant Activation
2014
motion study and video

Final chosen works for Project Anywhere are in and posted for the 2014-15 season. Department of Biological Flow's Channel Surf is one of 5 projects worldwide selected for this program of arts-based research inquiry.

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Channel Surf is an open platform for arts-based research that will unfold during a 200km journey paddling from Kingston to Ottawa along Canada’s Rideau Canal. With approximately 30 participants at any one time (the majority completing the entire trip and a smaller subset dynamically interchanging along the journey), it is envisaged that daily activities of co-creation and mutual learning will emerge.  Accordingly, the canal will metaphorically assume the role of information channel, and the paddlers that of data packets invested with inventive agency in transit.

Final chosen works for Project Anywhere are in and posted for the 2014-15 season. Department of Biological Flow's Channel Surf is one of 5 projects worldwide selected for this program of arts-based research inquiry.

- - -

Channel Surf is an open platform for arts-based research that will unfold during a 200km journey paddling from Kingston to Ottawa along Canada’s Rideau Canal. With approximately 30 participants at any one time (the majority completing the entire trip and a smaller subset dynamically interchanging along the journey), it is envisaged that daily activities of co-creation and mutual learning will emerge. Accordingly, the canal will metaphorically assume the role of information channel, and the paddlers that of data packets invested with inventive agency in transit.

Francisco-Fernando Granados
spatial profiling
2010-11
performance, drawing installation

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performed during reLIVE at VIVO Media Arts Centre as part of the LIVE 2011 Biennial of Performance Art on September 25, 2011

Jesús Soto
Espiral Doble
1955
39 x 39 cm

top:
Liz Deschenes
Moiré #6 & #7 (diptych)
2007
UV laminated chromogenic prints
60” x 97 11/16”

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bottom:
Liz Deschenes
Left/Right
2008
Fujiflex print mounted on aluminum
23” x 38”

Naum GaboTorsion (Variation no. 3)1963

Naum Gabo
Torsion (Variation no. 3)
1963

"Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view" (NatGeo).

"Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view" (NatGeo).

Pavel TchelitchewHead from Spiral Head series1950pastel on paper

Pavel Tchelitchew
Head from Spiral Head series
1950
pastel on paper

ATROPOS: A TOPOLOGY OF DISASTER

A One-Day Event of Speculative Fiction, Collaborative Storytelling and Aesthetico-Ethical Creation

Open Call for Participation // August 10, 2013 // OISE – University of Toronto

curated by Department of Biological Flow

Atropos: one of the three Greek goddesses of fate and destiny, the eldest of the sisters, the one known as both inflexible and inevitable. It was Atropos who determined the end of life for each mortal by cutting their thread with a pair of shears. Mortality: one is alive and spinning a fibre at one moment, only to receive an untimely severance the next.

But this is not to gender the forthcoming disaster. Rather, we are interested in exploring the potential of the cut itself: its tempo, decisiveness, beauty and trauma—in short, its gesture. We approach disaster as a woven and folded tapestry of relations rather than as an accumulation of solitary threads, complicating the idea of a single fateful cut in the process. We suggest that while some cuts are more surgical and others more ragged, affirmative potentials may be found within each context.

Finally, we understand that the disaster is not some unknown future to come. It is already here—not forthcoming, but instead coming forth: the spectre of Atropos writ large over planetary destiny as an increasingly forceful precondition of the everyday. Collective imagination as gravitational force.

How does the artist or thinker respond as the blades slowly close?

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The Department of Biological Flow invites artists, thinkers, movers, activists and healers to participate in a one-day event of research-creation titled Atropos: A Topology of Disaster. While we will be engaging the topic of disaster as a potential throughout the day, this is meant to be an affirmative opportunity for imagination rather than one of nihilism and violence: various creative activities will take place during the workshop, and beyond that there are some secret twists which we won’t reveal until the event proper.

There is no fee to attend, save for some sort of contribution to a communal luncheon we will enjoy together as a group that day. The event is being graciously hosted by Dr. Stephanie Springgay, who studies contemporary art and pedagogy in the Curriculum, Teaching and Learning program at OISE.

https://www.facebook.com/events/463738777038256/

ATROPOS: A TOPOLOGY OF DISASTER

A One-Day Event of Speculative Fiction, Collaborative Storytelling and Aesthetico-Ethical Creation

Open Call for Participation // August 10, 2013 // OISE – University of Toronto

curated by Department of Biological Flow

Atropos: one of the three Greek goddesses of fate and destiny, the eldest of the sisters, the one known as both inflexible and inevitable. It was Atropos who determined the end of life for each mortal by cutting their thread with a pair of shears. Mortality: one is alive and spinning a fibre at one moment, only to receive an untimely severance the next.

But this is not to gender the forthcoming disaster. Rather, we are interested in exploring the potential of the cut itself: its tempo, decisiveness, beauty and trauma—in short, its gesture. We approach disaster as a woven and folded tapestry of relations rather than as an accumulation of solitary threads, complicating the idea of a single fateful cut in the process. We suggest that while some cuts are more surgical and others more ragged, affirmative potentials may be found within each context.

Finally, we understand that the disaster is not some unknown future to come. It is already here—not forthcoming, but instead coming forth: the spectre of Atropos writ large over planetary destiny as an increasingly forceful precondition of the everyday. Collective imagination as gravitational force.

How does the artist or thinker respond as the blades slowly close?

~

The Department of Biological Flow invites artists, thinkers, movers, activists and healers to participate in a one-day event of research-creation titled Atropos: A Topology of Disaster. While we will be engaging the topic of disaster as a potential throughout the day, this is meant to be an affirmative opportunity for imagination rather than one of nihilism and violence: various creative activities will take place during the workshop, and beyond that there are some secret twists which we won’t reveal until the event proper.

There is no fee to attend, save for some sort of contribution to a communal luncheon we will enjoy together as a group that day. The event is being graciously hosted by Dr. Stephanie Springgay, who studies contemporary art and pedagogy in the Curriculum, Teaching and Learning program at OISE.

https://www.facebook.com/events/463738777038256/

Jenn StarkVortextural2013installation of hand-cut acid-free paper, foam board, glue42” x 35” x 30”

Jenn Stark
Vortextural
2013
installation of hand-cut acid-free paper, foam board, glue
42” x 35” x 30”