Nonsense Lab
CHANNEL SURF is an open platform for arts-based research and philosophic inquiry curated by the Department of Biological Flow that will canoe 200km up the Rideau Canal in Canada over 12 days during June 2015. Each day, we will think, move and co-create in a thematic embodiment of the canal as information channel, and the paddlers as collective data packets exploring signal, noise, threshold + water, land, littoral. It is one 5 projects worldwide to be chosen for the current cohort of Project Anywhere.

Registration is now open, first-come, first-served. Participants are invited to join on a 12-day, 6-day, 4-day or 3-day basis.

CHANNEL SURF is an open platform for arts-based research and philosophic inquiry curated by the Department of Biological Flow that will canoe 200km up the Rideau Canal in Canada over 12 days during June 2015. Each day, we will think, move and co-create in a thematic embodiment of the canal as information channel, and the paddlers as collective data packets exploring signal, noise, threshold + water, land, littoral. It is one 5 projects worldwide to be chosen for the current cohort of Project Anywhere.

Registration is now open, first-come, first-served. Participants are invited to join on a 12-day, 6-day, 4-day or 3-day basis.

Robert TaiteUntitled Work from Always Somewhere Else2014wood, latex paint, varathane48” x 48”

Robert Taite
Untitled Work from Always Somewhere Else
2014
wood, latex paint, varathane
48” x 48”

Department of Biological Flow
Three Lines for Plant Activation
2014
motion study and video

Final chosen works for Project Anywhere are in and posted for the 2014-15 season. Department of Biological Flow's Channel Surf is one of 5 projects worldwide selected for this program of arts-based research inquiry.

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Channel Surf is an open platform for arts-based research that will unfold during a 200km journey paddling from Kingston to Ottawa along Canada’s Rideau Canal. With approximately 30 participants at any one time (the majority completing the entire trip and a smaller subset dynamically interchanging along the journey), it is envisaged that daily activities of co-creation and mutual learning will emerge.  Accordingly, the canal will metaphorically assume the role of information channel, and the paddlers that of data packets invested with inventive agency in transit.

Final chosen works for Project Anywhere are in and posted for the 2014-15 season. Department of Biological Flow's Channel Surf is one of 5 projects worldwide selected for this program of arts-based research inquiry.

- - -

Channel Surf is an open platform for arts-based research that will unfold during a 200km journey paddling from Kingston to Ottawa along Canada’s Rideau Canal. With approximately 30 participants at any one time (the majority completing the entire trip and a smaller subset dynamically interchanging along the journey), it is envisaged that daily activities of co-creation and mutual learning will emerge. Accordingly, the canal will metaphorically assume the role of information channel, and the paddlers that of data packets invested with inventive agency in transit.

Francisco-Fernando Granados
spatial profiling
2010-11
performance, drawing installation

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performed during reLIVE at VIVO Media Arts Centre as part of the LIVE 2011 Biennial of Performance Art on September 25, 2011

Jesús Soto
Espiral Doble
1955
39 x 39 cm

top:
Liz Deschenes
Moiré #6 & #7 (diptych)
2007
UV laminated chromogenic prints
60” x 97 11/16”

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bottom:
Liz Deschenes
Left/Right
2008
Fujiflex print mounted on aluminum
23” x 38”

Naum GaboTorsion (Variation no. 3)1963

Naum Gabo
Torsion (Variation no. 3)
1963

"Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view" (NatGeo).

"Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view" (NatGeo).