Nonsense Lab

Shinseungback Kimyonghun
Cloud Face
2012
pigment inkjet print on cotton rag paper
200 cm x 80 cm

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Human sees figures in clouds: animals, faces and even god. This kind of perception also appears in computer vision. Face-detection algorithms sometimes find faces that are not. It is because human’s knowledge of a face and understanding of human vision mechanisms affect the development of the computer vision.

Cloud Face is a collection of cloud images that are recognized as human face by a face-detection algorithm. It is a result of computer’s vision error, but they look like faces to human eyes, too. This work attempts to examine the relation between computer vision and human vision.

Department of Biological Flowasciii rumble2013thermopoetics

Department of Biological Flow
asciii rumble
2013
thermopoetics

Ana Teresa Barboza
untitled works
2008
embroidery and transfer on canvas
5 pieces of 32cm x 45cm

Mia Liu
Can’t Stop Rolling it Up
2010
acrylic on watercolor paper and aluminum plate

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"The story of Can’t Stop Rolling It Up has started from a flat drawing. After being enlarged proportionally onto 144 full-sheet water color papers, the drawings are cut, curled, and then pieced together onto an aluminum board. Shades that appear underneath the curls also become part of the visual elements in the work. Simply by adjusting the viewing distance, the audience also shifts between macrocosmic or microcosmic views, experiencing the work in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects.”

Gary Schneider
South African Handprint Portraits
2011
sweat and heat imprints on film emulsion

Louise BourgeoisCell (Eyes and Mirrors)1989-93marble, mirrors, steel, and glass

Louise Bourgeois
Cell (Eyes and Mirrors)
1989-93
marble, mirrors, steel, and glass

So, you’ve got a broken TV that Wii induced and you want to turn it into an art project, eh?

OK.

Some thoughts on process:

1. What are the anatomical elements of the technology that you wish to explore, if any?

2. What is it about the technology’s “broken-ness” or “error” that is of interest?

3. What are the notable visual elements of the crack, materially and aesthetically?

4. Are there any other senses engaged by this crack?

5. How do we understand the cracked image in relation to the “edge of affect”?

6. How is the gesture that Wii produced and its resultant crack a cut through the skin — or better, a skin tectonics?

So, you’ve got a broken TV that Wii induced and you want to turn it into an art project, eh?

OK.

Some thoughts on process:

1. What are the anatomical elements of the technology that you wish to explore, if any?

2. What is it about the technology’s “broken-ness” or “error” that is of interest?

3. What are the notable visual elements of the crack, materially and aesthetically?

4. Are there any other senses engaged by this crack?

5. How do we understand the cracked image in relation to the “edge of affect”?

6. How is the gesture that Wii produced and its resultant crack a cut through the skin — or better, a skin tectonics?

An image of thought is always incomplete, since it is a projection of the empirical body (animal, social, ecological) out into the knowable world, mediated as such by a technics of intersubjectivity. In our primarily ocularcentric society this often assumes the perspectival form, a taking of the image at some removed distance for a considered (and reconsidered) understanding and appraisal. The incomplete image of thought is thus always a biased

An image of thought is always incomplete, since it is a projection of the empirical body (animal, social, ecological) out into the knowable world, mediated as such by a technics of intersubjectivity. In our primarily ocularcentric society this often assumes the perspectival form, a taking of the image at some removed distance for a considered (and reconsidered) understanding and appraisal. The incomplete image of thought is thus always a biased

Hyper Geography (detail)

http://hypergeography.tumblr.com/

Hyper Geography (detail)

http://hypergeography.tumblr.com/

Sean SmithAmerican Sporting Alphabet2007silkscreen t-shirt project

_____

A remix in homage to Heidi Cody’s contemporary pop art classic American Alphabet, this project mines the iconic logos that represent the teams, management and media influences of a particular American sporting tradition.

American Sporting Alphabet then injects these remixed images back into the circuits of electronic production and consumption in the form of “sports merchandise” — challenging questions of intellectual property and the commons of the imagined sporting community in the process.

But American Sporting Alphabet is also an indirect critique of Cody’s work in that it demonstrates how the recombinant logic undermining a particular network of signification may itself form an abstract diagram able to slide transversally into other aesthetic and political contexts.

Sean Smith
American Sporting Alphabet
2007
silkscreen t-shirt project

_____

A remix in homage to Heidi Cody’s contemporary pop art classic American Alphabet, this project mines the iconic logos that represent the teams, management and media influences of a particular American sporting tradition.

American Sporting Alphabet then injects these remixed images back into the circuits of electronic production and consumption in the form of “sports merchandise” — challenging questions of intellectual property and the commons of the imagined sporting community in the process.

But American Sporting Alphabet is also an indirect critique of Cody’s work in that it demonstrates how the recombinant logic undermining a particular network of signification may itself form an abstract diagram able to slide transversally into other aesthetic and political contexts.